Stay in the Wakelyns Farmhouse

Come and stay in the Wakelyns Farmhouse – extensively renovated and completely updated to be a great place for a family or group to enjoy staying at the heart of the Wakelyns and all that is going on here – organic agroforestry farming, and so much more.

The Wakelyns farmhouse sits in the heart of the 56 acres of organic agroforestry, and surrounding meadows, farm buildings and old barns.

The house sleeps 12 in 5 bedrooms with six bathrooms, including one bedroom – the garden room – on the ground floor accessible for people with mobility difficulties. 

The house is a Grade II listed building – a classic Suffolk “longhouse” arranged over three floors, with the oldest part of the house dating back around 500 years with quirky wood beams, low ceilings, amazing doors and strange but interesting ironmongery poking out in weird places. Extra luxury comes from modern additions, including the garden room, kitchen and conservatory.

During your stay, as well as self-catering using the well-equipped modern kitchen, you can also order delicious food or teaching/help to cook yourself from the team at the  Wakelyns Bakery – see here.

Inside the Wakelyns Farmhouse

Like all such houses, bits have been added on or adapted over time including what we think is part of the house built about 200 years ago with beams and floor boards that are probably from a ship. In our family’s time – over the last 30 years – we have added a beautiful modern high vaulted kitchen leading to a garden conservatory, and a modern accessible ground floor bedroom with en suite wet room.

A bit of history

Ann and Martin Wolfe bought Wakelyns in 1992 and planted the first agroforestry tree lines in 1994 which surround the north side of the house.  You will see lots of their influences in the house, including many of their books, pictures and furniture.  Since 2020 in making major improvements to the house so that it is ready for visitors, the Wolfe family have restored and upgraded many parts of the house and garden, and have left some of Ann and Martin’s things around for visitors to enjoy during their stay.  We have enjoyed engaging many local craftspeople in the restoration project.  It is a very comfortable house which has had a considerable make-over, but it is not flashy or chintzy. 

A house with character

Things you need to know about the house: it is an old house so it inevitably makes friendly burps, creaks and noises which gives the house character!  It is the most wonderful place to be in the winter when you can get cosy in front of the fires in each of the two sitting rooms, and then the most idyllic place to be in the long warm days of the summer.

Kitchen, conservatory, lounges and dining

The kitchen and conservatory are definitely the social hub of the house with a central island in the kitchen, and a range of seating options in the conservatory. 

The modern kitchen is equipped with most things you would need to make the most of self-catering if you wanted to, including things like kitchen scales, cake tins and mixing bowls, two Neff hobs and two Neff ovens, and a wood fired Stanley range oven.

Looking out of the kitchen window by the sink across the wildflower meadow you see the agroforestry tree lines, and get a splendid view of the wind turbine constructed in 2020, with quirky art welded birds made from old machinery parts that were reclaimed from around the farm.  The sunny conservatory is a wonderful spot for socialising and in which to enjoy the garden.  Although the house sits in the heart of a working farm, it can still feel quite private.

The cosy dining room features an old brick floor, and it is in here that you catch a glimpse of the hazel sticks and lathe between the beams of which the walls of the house are made.

The lounge is a great place to relax in the evenings in front of the open fire using logs of firewood from the agroforestry tree lines and stored in the log store outside the house made from a local craftsman from local timber, or a cool place to which to retreat on a warn summer’s day.  The lounge is probably the oldest part of the house (500 years old in parts) and has the most magnificent central beam with interesting iron hooks, and some wonderful old wooden doors.

The lounge leads through to the ‘piano room’ at the end of the house.  This part of the house is probably about 200+ years old.  Inspired by their time living in Switzerland, Ann and Martin installed a magnificent tile stove (or, Kacheloffen) in to this room, which uses bales of coppiced willow in the stove at the bottom which heats the huge brick tiles above.  This room also boasts old Grandma Wolfe’s baby grand piano, and a rather decadent drinks cabinet filled with a wonderful range of carefully sourced charity shop glasses for those evening tipples. It’s cosy in the winter and also delightfully cool on a hot summer’s day.

5 bedrooms with 6 bathrooms

The 12 single beds were specially made for us by Bob out of Wakelyns sycamore and other locally-sourced wood. Every single bed is unique.  The single beds join together and make the most amazingly comfortable “superking” [sic] size, so each room can either be arranged as singles or as larger beds for folks to share.  Bob also used this wood to make the lovely clothes hanging rails in each bedroom. 

The bedrooms are laid out as follows:

Ground floor:

The Garden Room – an accessible room which sleeps 1 or 2, arranged as 2 singles or superking double.  Adjacent accessible wet room with toilet, basin and shower.  Small sofa.  Clothes hanging rail.  Views across the agroforestry tree lines.

First floor:

The East Bedroom – sleeps up to 3, arranged as 1 superking and 1 single, or 3 singles.  It has a small ensuite shower room.  Clothes hanging rail; chest of drawers. Amazing elm floor boards. Lovely views over the garden.

Middle bedroom – sleeps up to 2, arranged as a superking or 2 singles.  Wonderful view over the magical farmhouse garden.  It has an ensuite bathroom with bath, basin and toilet.  Clothes hanging rail; chest of drawers. This is a lovely peaceful room and if you open the bedroom door in the morning you can lay in bed and see the sunrise over the agroforestry tree lines.

The West Bedroom – sleeps up to 2, arranged as superking or 2 singles.  This is a very sweet room – with low beamed ceiling – with views over the garden and the numerous visiting birds.  Clothes hanging rail; chest of drawers. Lovely views over the garden from the bedroom itself. This room has its large bathroom next door with amazing views over the agroforestry tree lines.

The Attic Bedroom – sleeps up to 3, arranged as 1 superking and 1 single, or 3 singles with roof light views of the fields and the stars. This is a stunning room with the most beautiful arched wood beams, probably made from timbers recycled from a boat.  It has a separate en suite shower room with amazing views over the agroforestry tree lines. Clothes hanging rail and sofa.

Garden:

As well as being able to enjoy the whole 56 acre area of Wakelyns during your visit, you will have sole use of the Farmhouse Garden with its mature wildflower lawn, hedges and planting. South facing so it really enjoys the sunshine, most of the garden is secluded from views so you can enjoy your own bit of Wakelyns in complete privacy.

Other things to know about the house

  • Board games in the coffee table in the sitting room.
  • The kitchen has a bean to cup coffee machine. Beans available.
  • Shampoo and conditioner is provided to make it easier for our eco waste treatment system.
  • Ben linen and towels are provided. They are all eco cotton.
  • Hairdryers in every bedroom.
  • Iron and ironing board.
  • Music system to plug your aux lead in to.
  • TV/DVD player in the “study”
  • The house has either stone or wooden floors, so you may want to remember to pack some slippers!
  • Guest WiFi (though the 4G is generally OK too, particularly outside and for Vodafone and EE)
  • Piano.
  • Heating and hot water from our biomass boiler.
  • Self-cater or order food from Henrietta and the team at the Wakelyns Bakery

Prices and booking

Houses like this seem to be priced on a whole-house per-day basis. So, for comparison:

  • School Holidays – £600/night or £4,000/week
  • May – September out of School Holidays – £500/night or £3,000/week
  • October – April out of School Holidays – £400/night or £2,000/week

We are also very happy to offer significant discounts on those rates for bookings from NGOs whose work relates to what we do at Wakelyns, particulalry farming, food or the environment. Come here for your team building, perhaps also involving our teaching/education building, seen in use for the Wakelyns Symposiusm in 2019.

Here is some quirky archive information about the house including the original sales particulars, and the stuff about its listing as a Grade II listed building.